Regional breakdown of 2023 Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Data

Regional breakdown of 2023 Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Data

The National Housing Federation has published regional breakdowns of the Equality, Diversity and Inclusion data collected for their report: ‘How diverse is England’s housing association workforce in 2023?’ This breakdown provides Housing Associations with localised EDI data and findings for their region which can better inform understanding, actions and targets.  

It is important to recognise that diversity at a senior level remains critical, even in less diverse communities. Diversity of leadership not only provides representation for underrepresented groups in all geographical locations but supports the provision and inclusion of different perspectives, increases innovation and effectiveness and improves trust and equity.

The NHF found that the key findings across all nine regions showed more similarities than differences.

Some key findings around ethnic diversity across the regions were:

  • Ethnic diversity at leadership level is a key area for future focus for most regions.
  • There was variation in whether there was a lack of representation amongst executives, board members or both.
  • There was variation in whether ethnic diversity at leadership level had increased or decreased since 2021.
  • Four regions were less ethnically diverse at executive level compared to 2021.

We have extracted some key findings around ethnic diversity in each region below:

East Midlands
  • Compared to the population and to residents, the workforce and boards are more ethnically diverse, with good representation of all ethnic groups except for ‘other ethnic groups’ on boards.
  • However, there is a huge lack of representation at executive level – 3% of executives are Asian or Asian British and the rest are White.
  • There has been no change to the ethnic diversity of East Midlands executives since 2021.
East of England
  • The workforce is largely representative when it comes to ethnicity – 85% of the workforce is White compared to 87% of the population and residents.
  • However, this ethnic diversity is not reflected in the leadership positions – for example, only 2% of executives are Black, African, Caribbean or Black British – the remainder are White.
  • Little has changed since 2021, when 1% of executives were Asian or Asian British and the remainder were White.
London
  • The workforce is largely representative – 65% of the workforce is White, compared to 67% of the population and 60% of residents.
  • As with the national data, leadership is less ethnically diverse, particularly executive teams.
  • 6% of executives are Black, African, Caribbean or Black British, compared to 20% of the workforce. This has fallen from 8% in 2021.
North East
  • The workforce is more ethnically diverse than the population and residents – 91% of the workforce are White compared to 94% of the population and 95% of residents.
  •  Leadership positions are not diverse – for example, 2% of those in executive positions are Asian or Asian British, reflecting the workforce, but the remaining 98% are White.
  • 4% of the workforce are Black, African, Caribbean or Black British, but there is no representation at executive or board level.
  • The workforce is more diverse compared to 2021 when 94% were White, but little has changed at leadership level.
North West
  • The workforce and board members are largely representative of the population – 84% of the workforce and boards are White compared to 82% of the population.
  • There’s a lack of ethnic diversity at executive level, as 90% of executives are White. This has improved since 2021, when it was 95%.
  • Only 4% of executive and board members are Black/African/Caribbean/Black British, compared to 8% of the workforce.
  • People who are Asian/Asian British are underrepresented at all levels – 10% of the population compared to 5% of workforce and executives and 7% of board members.
South East
  • The workforce is representative of the population, which is less ethnically diverse compared to the national data.
  • There is some improvement in the representation on boards, with more ethnic diversity compared to 2021 – for example, 7% of board members are Black, African, Caribbean or Black British, up from 4% in 2021.
  • However, executive positions are less diverse where 95% of executive positions are White, compared to 92% in 2021.
South West
  • Compared to national data, there is a lack of ethnic diversity across all workforce groups. However, this is representative of the population and residents of housing associations based in the South West of England.
  • Boards are more diverse compared to the workforce – for example, 7% of board members are Asian / Asian British, compared to 1% of the workforce.
  • Across all workforce groups, there’s been a small increase in diversity compared to 2021 – for example, 94% of the workforce are White, compared to 97% in 2021.
West Midlands
  • The workforce closely represents the ethnic diversity of residents.
  • Board members are representative of the workforce, but executives are less diverse – 94% of executives are White, compared to 85% of the workforce and only 1% are Black, African, Caribbean or Black British, compared to 7% of the workforce.
  • Executive teams are less diverse than they were in 2021, when 90% of executives were White and 5% were Black, African, Caribbean or Black British.
Yorkshire and Humber
  • The workforce reflects residents, but compared to the population, Asian or Asian British people are underrepresented (11% compared to 5%).
  • Boards are more diverse than the workforce – 11% are Asian or Asian British, and 8% are Black, African, Caribbean or Black British.
  • Executive teams are less diverse than the workforce – 93% of executives are White, compared to 91% of the workforce.
  • Workforce and executives are less diverse compared to 2021 when 85% of executives and 87% of the workforce were White.

You can find the full, National Housing Federation’s Regional Breakdowns here.